Dictionary full of root words

Dictionary full of root words Техника

A medical example of a Greek-based color word is erythrokinetics (e·ryth·ro·ki·net·ics), defined as «A study of the kinetics of red blood cells from their generation to destruction.»

A suffix is an inseparable form that cannot be used alone but that carries an indication of quality, action, or relation. When added to a combining form, it makes a complete word and will determine whether the word is a noun, adjective, verb, or adverb.

In English grammar, a root is a word or portion of a word from which other words grow, usually through the addition of prefixes and suffixes. By learning root words, you can decipher unfamiliar words, expand your vocabulary, and become a better English speaker. 

A quick example in English: Backpack and ratpack contain what looks like a suffix (pack), but, as we know, pack is a noun and verb on its own.

(Note: breathing marks are missing. These forms and the other tables are excerpted from Hough’s book but have been modified based on corrections submitted by readers.)

And from the Latin, we have:

A suffix combined with a root is different from a compound word which, in loose English usage, is usually thought of as just another case of root + suffix. Sometimes two Greek or Latin words are put together to form a compound word. Often we think of these words as suffixes when they aren’t, technically, although they may be thought of as end forms.

Here are more combining forms that are important to know since they are numbers. If you’ve ever had trouble remembering whether millimeter or kilometer was closer to an inch, pay attention here. Note that the milli- is Latin and the kilo- is Greek; the Latin is the smaller unit, and the Greek the larger, so millimeter is a 1000th part of a meter (.0363 of an inch) and the kilometer is 1000 meters (39370 inches).

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Some of these numerals are derived from adverbs, most from adjectives.

John Hough, Scientific Terminology; New York: Rhinehart & Company, Inc. 1953.

If you recognize the Greek and Latin prefixes and affixes, you’ll understand the words as a whole.

«As someone trained in foreign languages and theoretical linguistics, I completely agree with the experts quoted in Why your kids should learn Latin. I would add that the study of Ancient Greek stems and affixes is equally valuable. As a follow-up to this article, I would suggest that you compile a short course on the meanings of Greek and Latin stems and affixes, focusing upon their value as reading aids in English and the Romance languages

The content of this article is based on Scientific Terminology by expert John Hough. Rather than an introduction to linguistics, it is meant to be an introduction to Classical stems and affixes.

English is really a fascinating language. While learning new concepts and grammar techniques you generally come across a lot of words. Sometimes you are eager to know the meaning of the words and search through the dictionary.

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Have to ever wonder how these words would have originated or from where they might have originated? The origin of these words is from different languages such as Sanskrit, French, Latin, Greek, and many more.

Содержание
  1. Greek and Latin Root Words List – Meaning & Examples
  2. Table of Greek Root Words List with Meanings & Examples
  3. List of Common Latin Root Words – Meanings & Examples
  4. 4 Great Reasons to Learn Greek and Latin Root Words
  5. Know One Root, Know Many Words
  6. Know a Suffix, Know the Part of Speech
  7. Know a Prefix, Know Part of the Definition
  8. Know Your Roots Because You Will Be Tested
  9. The Roots of Words
  10. Greek Root Words
  11. Adjective + Root + Suffix = Word
  12. Root + Suffix = Word
  13. Why Study Terminology
  14. Root + Suffix/Prefix = Word
  15. Latin Root Words
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Greek and Latin Root Words List – Meaning & Examples

But before moving ahead we need to understand what do we mean by root words.

We know that the English words are formed by using some basic words and deriving a combination of words by adding prefixes and suffixes. This basic word to which we add suffix and prefix is called the root words. They are called so because they form the basis or foundation of a new word. It is essential to know that the root words are worse in its own right. They are sometimes a stand-alone word. It is very essential to understand the meaning of the common root word as it will help you to deduce the meaning of the new words that you might encounter. Sometimes the root word may have more than one meaning. Suppose you come across a greek word ‘tele’, it means far. Now when you add proper suffix or prefix to the word, you can get a new word such as television, telegraph, or telephone.

Let’s see some of the new words which are derived from various Latin & Greek root words.

Table of Greek Root Words List with Meanings & Examples

That was a list of greet words. Let’s now have a quick look at different Latin origin words and their meanings.

List of Common Latin Root Words – Meanings & Examples

Phew!, that was a long list, you would not be able to learn all the words in one go.

Now, you are familiar with an extensive list of Latin as well as Greek Root words. These root words give rise to newly formed complex words which will help you to improvise your English vocabulary. Make sure that you use each word every day while drafting some content or use it in your conversation on a daily basis. These root words would be applicable to creating some innovating words.

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4 Great Reasons to Learn Greek and Latin Root Words

Matt Lincoln / Getty Images


Greek and Latin roots aren’t always the most fun to memorize, but doing so pays off in a very big way. When you know the roots behind the vocabulary that we use in everyday language right now, you have a step up on vocabulary comprehension that other people may not have. Not only will this help you in school across the board (science fields are known for their use Greek and Latin terminology), but knowing Greek and Latin roots will help you on major standardized tests like the PSAT, ACT, SAT and even the LSAT and GRE.

Why spend time learning the origins of a word? Well, read below and you’ll see.

Know One Root, Know Many Words

Knowing one Greek and Latin root means that you know many words associated with that root. Score one for efficiency.

If you understand that any time you see the root, theo-, you’re going to be dealing with «god» in some form, you’d know that words like theocracy, theology, atheist, polytheistic, and others all have something to do with a deity even if you’ve never seen or heard those words before.  Knowing one root can multiply your vocabulary in an instant. 

Know a Suffix, Know the Part of Speech

Knowing one suffix, or the word ending can often give you the part of speech of a word, which can help you know how to use it in a sentence.

A word that ends in -ist will usually be a noun and will refer to a person’s job, ability, or tendencies. For instance, a cyclist is a person who cycles. A guitarist is a person who plays the guitar. A typist is a person who types. A somnambulist is a person who sleepwalks (som = sleep, ambul = walk, ist = a person who).  

Know a Prefix, Know Part of the Definition

Knowing the prefix, or the word beginning can help you understand part of the word, which is really helpful on a multiple choice vocabulary test. 

Root: a-, an-

Definition: without, not

Atypical means not typical or unusual. Amoral means without morals. Anaerobic means without air or oxygen. If you understand a prefix, you’ll have a better time guessing the definition of a word you may not have seen before.

Know Your Roots Because You Will Be Tested

Every major standardized test requires you to understand more difficult vocabulary than you’ve seen or used before. No, you won’t have to write the definition of a word down or select a synonym from a list anymore, but you will have to know the complex vocabulary, anyway.

Take, for instance, the word incongruous. Let’s say it appears in the Redesigned PSAT Writing and Language Test. You have no idea what it means and it’s in the question. Your correct answer relies on your vocabulary comprehension. If you remember that the Latin root “congruence” means “to come together” and the prefix in- negates what’s behind it, then you may get that incongruous means «not together or inharmonious.» If you didn’t know the root, you wouldn’t even have a guess. 

axon

axonography

axonometric

axiology

axiom

axiomatic

axis

axisymmetry

auspice

auspicious

avian

aviary

aviation

aviator

avarice

avaricious

avarous

ave

avid

avidity

autarchy

authentic

autism

autocracy

autograph

automatic

autonomy

aural

auricle

aurinasal

auscultate

auscultation

aureate

aureole

auction

augend

augment

augmentation

augur

augury

august

author

auxiliary

inauguration

audible

audio

audiology

audit

audition

auditorium

auditory

audacious

audacity

athlete

athletic

decathlon

pentathlon

triathlon

aster

asterisk

asteroid

astrology

astronomy

astronaut

diasterism geaster

monaster

asperity

exasperate

asinine

ass

easel

arthritic

arthritis

arthropod

arthroscopic

arthrosis

artifact

artifice

artificial

artificiality

artisan

inert

inertia

aristocracy

aristocrat

arid

argent

Argentina

aretaic

arete

arduous

ardent

ardor

arson

Antarctic

arctic

Arctic Ocean

palearctic

archaeology

archaic

archaism

anarchy

archangel

archetype

architect

archon

autarchism

autarchy

exarch

monarchy

oligarchy

patriarchy

polyarchy

synarchy

triarchy

arcane

arcanum

arbiter

arbitrage

arbitrary

arbitration

arable

aquamarine

aquarium

aqueduct

aquifer

aperient

apéritif

aperitive

aperture

overt

overture

pert

aphelion

apocrine

apocryphal

apogee

aporrhinosis

apostasy

apostate

anthropology

anthroposophy

anthropomorphic

misanthrope

philanthropy

anthracite

anthracycline

anthrax

anther

anthology

antebellum

antediluvian

anticipate

antiquarian

antiquated

antique

antiquity

antagonist

antagonize

antibiotic

antipodes

antirrhinum

anniversary

annual

centennial

millennium

perennial

animal

animation

anemograph

anemometer

anemone

anemophilous

anemophobia

anemotropism

androgen

android

polyandrous

polyandry

anabaptist

anaphylaxis

anarrhexis

anion

anode

anaerobic

anhydrous

ambrosia

arrhythmia

atheism

atypical

ample

amplify

amplitude

amphibian

amphibolic

amphitheatre

amphoterism

amiable

amicable

amity

enemy

enmity

inimical

ambulance

ambulatory

preamble

ambidexterity

ambient

ambiguous

ambit

ambition

ambivalent

amboceptor

amputation

ancipital

andante

amateur

amatory

amenity

amoration

amorous

enamoured

altimeter

altitude

allograph

allophone

parallax

alias

alibi

alien

alter

alternate

altruism

analgesic

arthralgia

neuralgia

albedo

albino

albumen

alacrity

allegro

agroforestry

agronomy

agriculture

peregrine

act

action

agenda

agent

agile

agitate

ambiguous

castigate

cogent

cogitate

cogitation

excogitate

mitigate

navigate

agony

antagonist

antagonize

demagogue

pedagogue

pedagogy

strategy

synagogue

age

coeval

eon

eternal

longevity

medieval

primeval

ether

ethereal

etheric

hypaethros

aesthesia

aesthesis

aesthete

aesthetics

anaesthetic

synesthesia

aerobic

aerodynamic

aeronautics

aeroplane

aerorrhachia

aerosol

aerotitis

adipocellular

adipose

accept

accurate

adapt

affect

agglomerate

aggrandize

aggregate

aggression

annectent

approximate

ascend

acerose

acupuncture

acute

acutifoliate

acrobatics

acromegaly

acronym

acrophobia

acropolis

acrostic

acidiferous

acidity

acidosis

acidulation

acidulous

acetate

acetic

acetone

acetum

acerbic

acrid

acrimony

exacerbate

abnormal

abrasion

absent

abstain

abstraction

auference

aversion

baculiform

baculum

bacteria

anabolic

anabolism

ball

ballista

ballistic

ballistospore

belomancy

belonephobia

bolide

catabolic

catabolism

devil

diabolic

emblem

emblematic

embolic

embolism

embolus

holometabolism

hyperbole

metabolism

parable

parabola

paraboloid

parle

parley

problem

problematic

symbol

symbolic

symbolism

taurobolium

thromboembolism

abaptiston

Anabaptist

baptism

baptize

barograph

barometer

barostat

barycentre

barycentric

baryogenesis

baryon

barysphere

baryton

barytone

hyperbaric

hypobaric

isobaric

base

basic

basis

basicranial

basioglossal

basirrhinal

basommatophoric

basolateral

debase

batholith

bathophobia

bathos

bathymetry

bathyscaphe

bathysphere

isobathic

beatification

antebellum

bellicose

belligerent

rebellion

beneficence

benefit

benevolent

benign

benignant

benignity

bicycle

biennial

bifocal

bigamy

binary

binoculars

biscotti

bib

beer

beverage

imbibe

bible

bibliography

biodiversity

biography

biohazard

biology

biome

biometric

biosphere

blastema

blastochyle

blastocoele

blastula

ectoblast

endoblast

entoblast

fibroblast

osteoblast

sideroblast

blennadenitis

blennophobia

blennosperma

blennorrhagia

bonify

bonitary

borealis

botanic

botanist

botanology

botany

beef

boor

bovine

bucinator muscle

brachiferous

brachial artery

brachiocubital

brachialgia

brachionerysipelas

brachionigraph

brachiorrhachidian

brachiosaurus

brachistochrone

brachycephaly

brachydactyly

bradycardia

bradysuria

bradytelic

branchiopneustic

branchiopod

nudibranch

abbreviate

brevextensor

brevicaudate

brevity

brief

bromatium

bromateccrisis

bromatherapy

bromatology

bromography

brome

Bromus

Bromus ramosus

bromate

bromide

bromine

bronchiole

bronchitis

bronchopneumonia

bronchus

Brontosaurus

brontology

brontophobia

buccal

buccilingual

buccolingual

bulbiform

bulbiparous

bulboartrial

bulborrhexis

bulbous

bulbule

bullectomy

bulliferous

ebullient

ebullism

bursa

bursalogy

bursar

bursary

bursectomy

bursiform

disburse

cachexia

cacodemon

cacography

cacophony

cacorrhacitis

kakistocracy

accident

cadaver

cadence

cascade

case

recidivism

caesura

excise

germicide

homicide

incisor

scissors

calisthenics

calligraphy

Callista

Callisto

calophyllous

kaleidoscope

calendar

claim

class

conciliate

conciliatory

council

intercalate

nomenclature

caldarium

caldera

calefacient

calefaction

calefactive

calefactory

calenture

calescent

calid

calor

calore

caloric

calorie

calorifacient

calorific

calorigenic

calorimeter

caudle

cauldron

chafe

chafery

chalder

chaldron

chaud-froid

chauffer

chauffeur

chauffeuse

decalescence

decalescent

nonchalance

nonchalant

recalescence

scald

calcite

calcitrant

calcium

calculate

calculus

chalicothere

chalk

recalcitrant

ecclesia

Ecclesiastes

ecclesiastic

ecclesiology

ecclesiophobia

epiclesis

paraclete

calumnious

calumny

cavil

challenge

apocalypse

calyx

epicalyx

eucalyptus

antechamber

bicameral

camaraderie

camber

camera

chamber

chamberlain

comrade

concamerate

concameration

multicamera

tricameral

unicameral

camisade

camisado

Camisard

camisole

chemise

camp

campaign

campesino

campestral

campicolous

campimetry

campsite

campus

champion

decamp

encamp

encampment

canaille

canary

canicule

canid

canine

Canis

Canis Major

cane

canister

canon

canonic

accent

cantata

canto

cantor

chant

enchant

recant

candela

candid

candle

candor

incandescent

incendiary

incense

capable

capacious

captive

caption

captivate

capture

conception

except

forceps

incipient

intercept

recipient

achievable

achieve

achievement

ancipital

ancipitous

biceps

bicipital

cabotage

cad

caddie

cadet

cape

capital

capitular

capitulate

capitulation

captain

chapter

chaptrel

chattel

chef

chief

chieftain

co-captain

co-captaincy

decapitate

decapitation

occipital

occiput

precipitation

precipitous

quadriceps

recap

recapitulate

sincipital

sinciput

sous-chef

subcaptain

triceps

tricipital

unicipital

vice-captain

vice-captaincy

cab

caper

caprice

Capricorn

caprine

capsule

arbonara

bicarbonate

carbon

carbonate

carbonation

Carboniferous

carbuncle

radiocarbon

chancel

chancellery

chancellor

chancery

incarcerate

incarceration

subchancel

carcinogenic

carcinoma

cardiac

cardiograph

cardioid

cardiology

cardiomyopathy

electrocardiogram

endocardium

epicardium

hemicardia

myocardium

pericardium

cardinal

cardinality

kern

carnage

carnal

carnality

carnary

carnate

carnation

carneous

carnival

carnivore

carnose

carnosity

carrion

caruncle

carunculate

charcuterie

charnel

discarnate

incarnadine

incarnate

incarnation

reincarnate

reincarnation

acarpous

angiocarpous

anisocarpic

Carpo

carpogonium

carpology

carpophagous

carpophore

carpospore

cystocarp

endocarp

epicarp

mesocarp

monocarpic

pericarp

polycarpic

procarp

pseudocarp

carpal

carpal tunnel syndrome

carpus

metacarpus

caste

castigate

castrate

chaste

chastity

incest

catabolic

catacomb

catalyst

catarrhine

catastrophe

catatonia

cathode

cation

catenary

concatenation

catharsis

cathartic

caudal

coda

accuse

because

causal

causative

cause

excuse

calm

catacaustic

caustic

cauter

cauterize

cautery

diacaustic

holocaust

hypocaust

cave

cavity

excavation

accede

cede

concede

precede

procedure

proceed

procession

recede

secede

succeed

success

ceiling

clandestine

conceal

occult

acceleration

celerity

caenogastropod

caenogenesis

Cenozoic

cenotaph

kenosis

cenobite

coenesthesia

coenocyte

censure

census

cent

centennial

centurion

percent

centenarian

centenary

centesimal

centesimation

eccentric

central

center

concentrate

concentric

centrifugal

centripetal

acephalic

acephaly

anencephaly

autocephaly

brachiocephalic

brachycephalic

cephalic

cephalomancy

cephalometry

cephalon

cephalopagus

cephalopod

diencephalon

dolichocephalic

encephalitis

encephalogram

encephalopathy

holoprosencephaly

hydrocephalus

macrocephaly

mesaticephalic

mesencephalic

mesocephalic

metencephalon

microcephaly

myelencephalon

neencephalon

paleencephalon

prosencephalon

rhombencephalon

rhombencephalosynapsis

syncephalus

telencephalon

ceramic

keratin

triceratops

ascertain

certain

concern

concert

decree

discern

excrement

secern

secret

cervix

cervical

et cetera

chiral

chiropractic

chiroptera

chelonia

chlorine

chlorophyll

chloroplast

hypochondriasis

choreography

chorus

chordata

cord

chromatic

chrome

chromium

chromosome

monochrome

polychrome

anachronism

chronic

chronicle

chronology

chronometer

synchronize

chrysalis

chrysolite

cilia

supercilious

incineration

succinct

circle

circular

circulate

circus

circumcise

circumference

circumlocution

circumnavigate

circumscribe

cirrhosis

cirrus

citation

cite

excite

incite

solicit

solicitous

civic

civil

civilian

civility

civilization

clade

acclaim

claim

clamor

exclamation

proclamation

reclamation

clarity

clear

declaration

iconoclast

osteoclast

clause

claustrophobia

conclude

exclude

exclusive

include

occlusion

occult

recluse

seclude

clavichord

clavicle

conclave

cleistogamy

cleithrum

clemency

inclement

clinic

decline

declination

incline

inclination

recline

cochlea

blastocoel

coelom

spongocoel

colander

coulee

percolate

colliculus

accolade

collar

coloration

coloratura

tricolor

comity

coagulate

collide

compress

connect

connote

contain

corrode

quondam

conic

conical

conoid

condiment

contraband

contraception

contradict

contraindicate

contrast

contravene

copious

copy

cornucopia

coprolite

coprophagia

coprophilia

copula

copulation

couple

accord

cordial

core

concord

courage

discord

discordant

encourage

record

coracoid

excoriate

cornea

cornucopia

unicorn

corona

coronation

corporation

corporal

corporeal

corpse

corpulent

corpuscle

incorporate

cortical

cosmic

cosmonaut

cosmopolitan

cosmos

microcosm

cosmetics

cosmetology

costal

cotyledon

cranium

crassitude

creation

creature

creole

procreation

recreation

accreditation

credence

credentials

credibility

credible

credit

creditor

credo

credulity

credulous

creed

discredit

incredible

incredulous

miscreant

recreant

crepidoma

accresce

accrescence

accrescent

accrete

accretion

accrue

concrete

crescendo

crescent

crew

decrease

increase

recruit

recruitment

surcrew

cribble

cribrate

cricoid

crepe

crispate

cristate

crisis

criterion

critic

critical

diacritic

endocrine

hypocrisy

crossopterygii

crucial

crucifix

crucify

excruciating

crural

apocryphal

cryptic

cryptography

ctenophore

cubic

cuboid

incubation

succuba

culinary

culpable

culprit

exculpate

cuneiform

accurate

curative

curator

cure

curious

manicure

pedicure

secure

sinecure

concur

concurrent

corridor

courier

course

currency

current

cursive

cursor

cursory

discourse

excursion

incur

occur

recur

recursion

recursive

succor

cavort

curb

curvature

curve

bicuspid

colony

cult

cultivate

cultivation

culture

cutaneous

cuticle

cyanide

bicycle

cycle

cyclic

cyclone

cyclops

unicycle

cylinder

cynology

cynosure

cystic

cnidocyte

cytoplasm

English vocabulary has been greatly influenced by Latin, and many of the words we use today have Latin roots. Understanding these Latin roots can help improve our vocabulary and comprehension of the English language.

In this article, we have compiled a list of 77 common Latin roots and their English derivatives, providing a useful resource for anyone looking to expand their knowledge of English vocabulary.

  • The Latin term for ship is “navis,” which gave rise to the root “nav” found in English words such as naval, navy, and navigation. Roman shipbuilding was advanced and contributed to the expansion of the Roman Empire.

  • The Latin root “nat” comes from “natus,” which means “born,” and can be found in English words like natal, native, and natality.

  • The Latin root “fili” is derived from the word “filius,” which means “son.” Many English words have been formed from this root, including filial and affiliation.

  • The root “frat” originates from the Latin word “frater,” which means “brother.” This root is found in many English words such as fraternal and fraternity.

  • The root “lum” is derived from the Latin word “lumen,” meaning “light.” Many English words contain this root, including “illuminate,” “luminescent,” and “luminary.”

  • The word arbor means “tree” in Latin. This root appears in English vocabulary words such as arborescence (a tree-like structure) and arboretum (a place where different varieties of trees are planted), as well as the adjective arboreal.

  • From stella (the Latin word for “star”). This is the basis of the adjective stellar (which means having the characteristics of a star) and the noun constellation (an astronomy term referring to a formation of stars).

  • The Latin adjective “magnus” meaning “great” gave rise to the root “magn”. This root is used in various English vocabulary words such as magnificent, magnanimous, and the verb to magnify.

  • The root “mat” is derived from the Latin word “mater,” which means “mother.” This root is found in many English words such as maternal and maternity.

  • The root “lun” is derived from the Latin word “luna,” meaning “moon.” It is the basis for several English words, including lunar (relating to the moon) and lunatic.

  • The Latin root “fort” is derived from the Latin word “fortis,” which means “strong” or “powerful.” This root has been used to form many English words that denote strength or power, such as “fortify,” “fortitude,” “fortress,” and “effort.”

  • The Latin word lac, meaning “milk,” has given rise to several English words, including lactate and lactose (a sugar found in milk).

  • The Latin word “lingua,” meaning “language,” has given rise to the root “lingu” in English. This root can be found in many English words such as linguistics, bilingual, and multilingual.

  • The Latin root “annu” comes from “annus,” meaning “year.” It forms several English terms related to time, including “anniversary,” “annual,” “annuity,” and “perennial.”

  • The Latin root “don” comes from the Latin word “donare,” which means “to give.” This root is commonly found in English terms related to giving, such as donation, donor, and condone. To condone means to approve or tolerate something that is wrong or inappropriate.

  • The Latin root “aqua” means water and is present in many English words associated with water or liquids, such as aquarium, aqueduct, and aquatic.

  • The Latin root “vac” originates from the Latin word “vacare,” which means “to be empty.” It is the origin of several English words such as “vacant”, “vacuum”, “evacuate”, and “vacation”.

  • The root “doc” is derived from the Latin verb “docere” meaning “to teach”. It appears in English words such as doctrine, doctorate, and document.

  • The word “liber” is a Latin root which can be found in English words such as liberty and liberalism. This word means “free” in the Latin language.

  • The Latin root “pater” is derived from the Latin word for “father.” Many English words have been derived from this root, and they all relate to the concept of fatherhood or authority figures. For example, the word “paternal” is an adjective that describes something relating to a father or a father’s side of the family. The term “paternity” refers to the state of being a father or the identity of a child’s father. Additionally, the word “patriarch” refers to the male head of a family or tribe.

  • The Latin root “fem” is derived from the word “femina,” which means “woman.” Several English words have been derived from this root, such as female, feminine, and feminist.

  • The Latin verb “vivere”, meaning “to live”, has given rise to the root “viv” in English, which can be found in words such as vivid, survive, and vivacious.

  • The Latin root “aev” is derived from the Latin word “aevum,” which means “age” or “era.” This root has been used to form many English words conveying the idea of a particular historical period or era. For example, the term “medieval” is derived from “aev,” and refers to the period in history between the 5th and 15th centuries. Another derivative of this root is the word “primeval,” which refers to the earliest period in history. The Latin root “aev” has also given rise to the term “longevity”.

  • The Latin word “anima,” meaning “soul,” is the origin of the root anim. Many English words have been derived from this root, including animal, animosity, and animation.

  • The Latin root “cept” from the verb “capere,” meaning “to take” or “to seize,” has been used in English to form words which are often related to the concept of receiving something. Examples include “accept,” “conception,” “perception,” and “reception.”

  • From the Latin verb credere, which means “to trust” or “to believe”. There are many English words that are derived from this root, such as accreditation, credentials, and to discredit.

  • The Latin word “cura,” meaning “care” or “concern,” has provided the root word “cur” in English. It is found in several words related to taking care of something or showing concern, such as “curator” for managing collections, “curative” for healing, and “curious” for expressing a strong desire to learn or know something.

  • The Latin root “dic” means “to say” or “to speak” and has been used to form many English words, such as “dictionary”, “diction”, “edict”, and “predict”. It is also the basis for words like “verdict”, “indictment”, and “benediction”.

  • The Romans are known for their aqueducts, which are structures that carry water from one place to another. The word “aqueduct” is derived from two Latin roots, “aqua” meaning “water” and “ductus” meaning “leading.” English words such as to deduce, to produce and to reduce all come from the root “duc”. This root’s origin is the Latin verb “ducere,” which means “to lead”.

  • The Latin saying “Caveat emptor” means “buyer beware”. The Latin root “empt” means “bought” or “purchased” and is the origin of English words such as “redemption”, “exempt”, and “preempt”.

  • The root “fac” (or “fact”) comes from the verb “facere,” which means “to make”. Other than it being the root of the commonly used English word “fact,” it can also be found in words such as benefactor, satisfaction, and artifact.

  • Words like conference, prefer, and fertile all contain the root “fer,” which is derived from the Latin verb “ferre” meaning “to carry” or “to bear”.

  • From the Latin verb facere (which means “to make” or “to do”). English language words such as magnificent, deficient, and sacrifice have all been derived from this common Latin root.

  • “Fin” comes from the word “finis,” which means “to end” in Latin. Words such as final, definition, and fine have been derived from this root.

  • While the word “flu” has meaning in English on its own, it is actually a Latin root as well. Flu can be found in many different English words that people use on a day-to-day basis, such as influence, fluid, and fluency. This root comes from the Latin origin word “fluere,” which means “to flow”.

  • The Latin root “gress” is derived from the Latin word “gressus” (or “gradus”), which means “step” or “way.” This root is found in many English words that convey the idea of movement or progress, both physical and abstract. For example, the term “progress” is derived from “gress,” and refers to the movement towards a goal or the advancement of something. Another derivative of this root is the word “congress,” which refers to a gathering of people for a specific purpose or to make progress in a particular field. The Latin root “gress” has also given rise to words such as “digress” and “transgress.”

  • In English, the words inhale, exhale, and exhalant all come from the Latin root “hal”, which is derived from the verb “halare” meaning “to breathe”.

  • The root “insul” comes from the Latin word “insula,” which means “island”. It appears in English words such as insular and insulation. Basically, the root “insul” evokes the notion of being isolated, either physically or mentally, like an island is separated from the rest of the world by water.

  • “Jac” comes from the word “jaceo,” which means “to be thrown” in Latin. However, the root jac is often understood to mean “lie” in English. This root word can be found in English words such as adjacent and circumjacent.

  • The Latin root “ject” comes from the verb “jacere,” which means “to throw.” In English, it is used to form words that relate to the act of throwing or casting. “Eject” means to throw or expel something, and “project” refers to throwing something forward or projecting it into the future.

  • The Latin verb “jungo” meaning “to join” gave rise to the root “junct” in English, which appears in words like junction, conjunction, and subjunctive.

  • Words such as jury, to abjure, and to conjure come from the Latin root “jur”. The origin word of this root is “ius,” which means “law”.

  • “Lect” is a root that is used in English words such as collection, intellect, and election. It comes from the Latin verb “legere,” which means “to choose” or “to gather”.

  • Words such as manicure, manuscript, and to manipulate are all derived from the Latin root “man,” which comes from the word “manus,” meaning “hand”.

  • The root word “memor” means “remember” in Latin. There are many English words that have been derived from this root, such as to commemorate or memoir.

  • In Latin, “merge” comes from the verb “mergere,” which means “to plunge” or “to dip”. The verbs to emerge and to submerge are examples of English words which contain the root “merge”.

  • “Miser” is a Latin root that is used in many common English words. It means “unhappy” or “wretched” and can be found in words such as commiseration, misery, and miserable.

  • Derived from the Latin word “mittere,” which means “to send,” the root “mit” is found in many English words. Examples of terms with the “mit” root include “admit,” “submit,” “emit,” and “permit,” which all involve some aspect of sending, allowing, or putting forth.

  • The Latin word “modus” means “measure” or “method” and is the origin of the root “mod” in English. This root has been used to create words like “immodest”, “mode” and “model”.

  • The root “pass” originates from the Latin word “passus,” which means “a step” or “a pace.” This root is found in many English words, including “passage” and “compass.”

  • The Latin root “pend” is widely used in English and is derived from the Latin verb “pendere,” which means “to hang down.” It appears in words like “append,” “depend,” “pendant,” and “suspense.”

  • The Latin root “ple” is derived from the verb “plere,” meaning “to fill”. It is present in several English words, including deplete, complete, and supplementary.

  • The root “plic” comes from the Latin verb “plicare,” which means “to fold.” It is present in words like “replicate,” “application,” and “complicated.”

  • The Latin root “port” comes from the verb “portare,” meaning “to carry.” It has given rise to English words such as “portable,” “porter,” “transportation,” and “report.”

  • The Latin verb “ponere” meaning “to put” gave rise to the root “posit” in English, which can be found in words such as opposite, position, and deposit.

  • The words correct, director, and rectangle are all examples of English words which contain the Latin root “rect”. “Rect” comes from the verb “regere,” which means “to direct”.

  • The Latin root “regul” originates from the noun “regula,” meaning “rule.” English words like “regular” and “regulation” are derived from this root.

  • The root “sacr” (or “secr”) comes from the verb sacrare, which means “to consecrate” or “to swear”. It can be found in English language words such as to consecrate, sacred, and sacrifice.

  • Words such as insolence, insolent, and obsolete come from the Latin root “sole,” which comes from “solere,” meaning “accustomed” or “in the habit of”.

  • The root “somn” comes from the Latin word “somnus,” meaning “sleep,” and it has made its way into many English words that relate to snoozing and slumber. For example, the word “insomnia” comes from this root and describes the inability to sleep. Another word derived from this root is “somnolent,” which means feeling drowsy or sleepy. You might also recognize the term “somnambulist,” which refers to a sleepwalker, someone who is up and about while still in a state of slumber.

  • The Latin root “son,” derived from the Latin word “sonus” meaning “noise” or “sound,” has contributed to a variety of English words. Some common examples include “unison,” “sonic,” and “consonant.”

  • The Latin verb “spectare” means “to look at,” and from it comes the root “spect” in English. Many English words contain this root, including “spectator” and “spectacular.”

  • The Latin root “sper” originates from the verb “sperare,” which means “to hope.” Many English words have been derived from this root, including “desperate” and “prosper.”

  • The Latin verb “struere,” meaning “to build” or “to construct,” gave rise to the root “stru” in English. This root is present in several English words, including constructive, instruct, and structural.

  • The root “ten” comes from the Latin verb “tenere,” which means “to hold”. It is the root of English words such as tenant, maintenance, and tenor. Other words derived from this word include sustenance and tenure.

  • This root comes from the noun “terra,” which means “earth” or “land”. Words derived from this root include extra-terrestrial, terracotta, and subterranean.

  • The Latin root “tract” derives from the Latin verb “tractare,” which means “to draw or pull.” In English, this root has been used to create a plethora of words with a range of meanings, often related to the idea of drawing or pulling something. For example, the term “attract” is derived from this root and describes the ability of something to draw in or pull towards itself. Another example is the word “detract,” which means to draw away from or diminish the value of something. The term “tractable” is another derivative of this root, denoting something easily managed or controlled.

  • “Und” comes from the word “unda,” which means “wave” in Latin. You can find this root in English words such as to abound, to surround, and abundance.

  • The root “us” is derived from the Latin noun “usus,” which means “use.” Several English words have been formed from this root, including “abuse,” “usurpation,” and “peruse.”

  • The Latin root “vag” comes from the verb “vagare,” which means “to wander”. It is the origin of English words such as extravagant, vagabond, and vague.

  • “Val” is a very common Latin root that appears in many different English words. For example, ambivalence, to validate, invalid, and value. “Val” comes from the verb “valere,” which means “to have strength”.

  • The English words verb and verbose are derived from the root “verb” which comes from the Latin noun “verbum,” meaning “word”.

  • The Latin root “vers” has its origin in the word “versus” that signifies “turn.” Numerous common English words incorporate this root, including “adverse,” “conversation,” and “anniversary.”

  • The root “vid” comes from the Latin verb “videre,” which means “to see”. It is the basis for several English words that relate to vision or observation. For example: evidence and video.

  • The root “vil” originates from the Latin adjective “vilis,” which can mean “cheap” or “vile.” Several English words have evolved from this root, including “revile” and “vilify.”

  • The Latin root “vor” derives from the Latin word “vorare,” meaning “to devour.” This root is used in English to create words related to eating. Words derived from this root include “carnivore,” “omnivore,” and “voracious.”

  • In Latin, the root “vot” comes from the verb “vovere,” which means “to promise” or “to vow”. Words such as devoted, vote and votary have all been derived from this common Latin root.

  • Understanding Latin roots is essential for improving one’s English vocabulary. This list of 77 Latin roots commonly used in English can serve as a helpful reference for learners and educators alike.

    By recognizing the roots and their meanings, one can decipher the meanings of unfamiliar words and expand one’s language skills. Learning the etymology of English words can also provide a fascinating insight into the history of the language and its evolution over time.

    The Roots of Words

    Most words in the English language are based on words from ancient Greek and Latin. The root of the word «vocabulary,» for example, is ​voc, a Latin root meaning «word» or «name.» This root also appears in such words as «advocacy,» «convocation,» «evocative,» «vocal,» and «vowel.» By dissecting words such as these, etymologists can study how a word has evolved over time and tell us about the cultures they came from.

    In some cases, root words might be slightly transformed en route to becoming part of words that we’re familiar with. In the above example, «vowel» is a word that’s clearly related to the voc root and its family of derivative words, and yet the «c» in «voc» is not present. There are several reasons for this sort of pattern, and the changes often depend on what language each individual word comes from, but it serves as a reminder that not every word with the same root will look exactly the same.

    Root words are also useful for creating new words, especially in technology and medicine, where new innovations occur frequently. Think of the Greek root word tele, which means «far,» and inventions that traverse long distances, such as the telegraph, telephone, and television. The word «technology» itself is a combination of two other Greek root words, techne, meaning «skill» or «art,» and logos, or «study.»

    Greek Root Words

    The table below defines and illustrates 25 of the most common Greek roots.

    Adjective + Root + Suffix = Word

    Root + Suffix = Word

    The suffix on please is an e. If you look at the word pleas-ure, it makes sense, since removing its suffix leaves the same root as in pleas-e. As John Hough, in Scientific Terminology, points out, roots rarely exist alone. They usually precede suffixes. The same is true of Greek and Latin, even if, when borrowing, we sometimes drop the suffix. Thus, the word cell in English is really the Latin cella, from which we’ve dropped the a suffix.

    Not only do almost all English words contain roots plus suffixes, but, according to Hough, suffixes can’t stand alone. A suffix does not have meaning on its own but needs to be connected to the root.

    Why Study Terminology

    How knowing the etymology of rhinoceros will help you understand your doctor’s diagnoses:

    «Sometime during the 14th century someone decided to give this mammal its present day name. The characteristic of the animal that struck them the most was the large horn that grew from its nose. The Greek word for nose is rhis, and the combining form (the form that is used when it is combined with other word elements) is rhin-. The Greek word for horn is keras. So this animal was named a «nose-horn animal» or a ‘rhinoceros […] You take a peek in your file and discover that [… the doctor] wrote ‘acute rhinitis’ as your diagnosis. Now having taken this course, you know that ‘acute’ just means sudden onset […] and you know that «-itis» simply means an inflammation.»

    Root + Suffix/Prefix = Word

    Prefixes are usually adverbs or prepositions derived from Greek or Latin that can’t be used alone in English and appear at the beginnings of words. Suffixes, which appear at the ends of words, aren’t usually adverbs or prepositions, but they can’t be used alone in English, either. While suffixes are often joined to the end of roots by separate connecting vowels, the transformation of these prepositional and adverbial prefixes is more direct, even though the final letter of the prefix may be changed or eliminated. In 2-letter prefixes, this can be confusing. Among other changes, n can become m or s and a final b or d may be changed to match the first letter of the root. Think of this confusion as designed to ease pronunciation.

    This list won’t help you figure out antipasto, but it will prevent you from describing the antonym of precedent as antident or polydent.

    Note: Greek forms are capitalized, Latin in normal case.

    Latin Root Words

    The table below defines and illustrates 25 of the most common Latin roots.

    ​Understanding the meanings of the common word roots can help us deduce the meanings of new words that we encounter. But be careful: root words can have more than one meaning as well as various shades of meaning. In addition, words that look similar may derive from different roots.

    In addition, a handful of root words can stand on their own as whole words in and of themselves. This list includes words such as photo, kinesis, chrome, port, and script. Words like this tend to have related meanings on their own, then can also act as roots for longer, more complex words.

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